Written work

 The International Writing Project

The International Writing Project (IWP) has been encouraging teachers to develop their own skills and write for enjoyment for nearly 30 years. Apart from being fun, there is an underlying pedagogical rationale: the research suggests that better writers become better teachers of writing. Co-founder and Co-Director, Elly Tobin looks back.

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Inspire reading

Transforming libraries

Since being knee high to a grasshopper Sally Flint has been reading books. Writing and education have been her passions. It was inevitable that she would become an English teacher and librarian! Here she offers six tips for transforming a good library into a great learning hub.

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Mind the gap!

Bridging a divide through lifelong learning

Tony Dickenson believes the relationship between teacher and student is evolving. Today, a more holistic approach, centred on inquiry requires a “collective approach,” with teacher and student exploring these concepts side by side.

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Write now

The importance of practising essential writing skills for EAL learners

As an adult or as a student, becoming competent in a language means being able to listen and understand, to speak and make meaning while using it to read and write.  Elly Tobin reflects on implications for those learning in a range of subjects using English, as a second language.

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Language rich

Supporting EAL learners

According to Elly Tobin. the needs of learners in international schools have changed dramatically over recent years and at Consilium we have seen a shift from school populations being largely English speaking expats to host national students with limited inital English proficiency seeking an international education through the medium of English.

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A journey worth taking

It will not be long before the number of British schools franchised for overseas campuses reaches the 100 mark. According to Nick Chaddock the explosion of British schools throughout the world shows no sign of slowing, and this phenomenon raises some important issues for EAL learners, as they master ‘academic’ English. 

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