Five ways to improve your listening skills

The key to collaborative planning and decision making

Listening, rather than talking, is the key to making an effective plan of action for a company or school, according to Peter Hudson. The trouble is, most people are not very good at it. Here Peter looks at five key ideas that will help the members of a team improve as listeners, and therefore as effective collaborative planners.

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Listening, journalism and broadcasters

Listening and “the truth”

Revelations have shaken our trust of journalists and broadcasters and led many to question whether they are committed to seeking the truth and fairness or are driven largely by a need to boost circulation and viewing figures. Peter Hudson explores the effectiveness of different journalistic and broadcasting approaches in establishing and reporting the facts.

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The Holy Grail of Social Listening

Throughout history, good conversation has been highly valued but what are the attributes of a good conversationalist? The ability to listen, rather than eagerly searching for the next opportunity to interject, is certainly one of them. Peter Hudson sets out on a quest to find the Holy Grail of social listening and discovers the old Cuban proverb rings very true;“Listening looks easy, but it’s not simple. Every head is a world.”

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September in ITM

ITM, Vol. 2, #1, September 2015: begin with a song

Andy Homden 9For me, a school year begins and ends with music.  In June we leave the school hall with familiar songs ringing in our ears after that final assembly. Two months later, I know that a new year is really under way when the campus falls quiet an hour or so after school re-opens, and suddenly, from the direction of the music rooms, the first chords of the piano interrupt the unnatural silence and children start learning a new song.

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Whiplash – jazz or motivation?

Whiplash is an award winning film of the journey of a budding jazz drummer towards brilliance. Set mostly in a rehearsal studio it describes the practice, drive, suffering and pain deemed necessary, by the teacher, to achieve excellence. Whilst in many ways gripping, should we also view its basic premise as deeply disturbing,  asks Peter Hudson.

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