November 2018

Join ECIS Connect, download Early Years resources and find out more about the growing links between International Schools and Oxford – just three new items from our November edition.

 

Read aloud!

Read aloud!

Children retain more information and gain greater understanding when they hear someone read to them, argues Stephen Murgatroyd.

Internationally well

Internationally well

During the summer of 2018, the first international school wellbeing research project was completed, reports Anne Keeling.

Assistive technology

Assistive technology

John Landrum looks at a variety of ways in which new technology can provide a level playing field for all learners.

The power of music

The power of music

Jules Fitzgerald argues that a good musical education gives children real advantages in their cognitive and social development.

Proofreading power

Proofreading power

Proofreading is generally considered to be the last part of an editing process. Chris Jay thinks it can be much more. 

Teach by example

Teach by example

Leah Davies suggests three steps to help children learn effectively by following our example.

Broaden young horizons

Broaden young horizons

Dr. Ger Graus makes a powerful case for experience-based learning as the key to social mobility.

Applying to Oxford?

Applying to Oxford?

Dr Alex Pryce suggests a deeper awareness of a university’s admissions process could benefit your students.

ECIS Connect

ECIS Connect

Kevin Ruth invites schools and educators around the world to join the ECIS Connect platform.

The Google alternative

The Google alternative

Bill Hess thinks there are good reasons for schools to consider alternatives to the market leader.

We're not afraid of the dark!

We're not afraid of the dark!

Lots of ideas and activities to dispel those fears, in two free PDFs collated by Jan Homden.

Listening to soldiers

Listening to soldiers

Peter Hudson looks at the work of Dr. William Rivers at Craiglockhart hospital during the First World War.

March in ITM

Connect and learn

ball-1020350__180Everything, as Sarah Whyte argues in her article, Consequential Thinking  is connected: things that happen in one place have consequences in others.  Vicky Hill’s article also shows how something apparently inconsequential – for example, a chance remark after lunch – can have profound and quite unexpected educational consequences. And as we all know, small events in the playground can affect learning later in the day, so making sure that playground design is the best that it can be, as Prue Walsh advocates, not only improves the quality of play, but also the learning that follows.

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