The Man Who Planted Trees (L’Homme qui Plantait des Arbres)

hommeCross-curricular inspiration

This is the ultimate teaching and learning resource. Students of French, history, literature, media studies, science, biology, the environment . . . . and leadership will be totally absorbed. The winner of the 1987 Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, is based on the original book by Jean Giono, also reviewed in ITM.

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Eddie the Eagle

Eddie the Eagle

web-eddie-the-eagle-movie-20th-century-fox

 

Initially ridiculed and slightly eccentric, Michael “Eddie” Edwards triumphed over adversity in his quest for ski-jumping fame at the 1988 Winter Olympics. Despite coming last, he became a hero to many and is now the subject of a recent film, reviewed for ITM by Jan Homden.

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Sing Street

sing-street_quad-poster-1243x932It’s the 1980s and times are hard in unpretentious Dublin. It’s the era of new romantics, punks and skinheads, with teenagers defending themselves for “looking different” as they seek a new identity and street style.

Music is influenced by bands such as; The Cure, A-ha, Duran Duran, The Clash, Spandau Ballet, The Jam and the latest Dublin boy band – ‘Sing Street’!
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Song of the Sea

It was a grey, wet Saturday when we set off to the local cinema for a midday screening of ‘Song of the Sea’. In a small studio theatre that was almost half full with an audience of 26, ranging from toddler to middle aged and everything in-between, we sampled ‘cinema treats’ while waiting for the film to begin.

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“Amy” – a poignant tale

Documentaries have undergone a renaissance in the past decade in terms of becoming more involving and cinematic. Movie buff and regular podcast reviewer Sue Page finds the recent biopic “Amy” an absorbing and intimate portrait of a prodigious talent and an all too short life.

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Whiplash – jazz or motivation?

Whiplash is an award winning film of the journey of a budding jazz drummer towards brilliance. Set mostly in a rehearsal studio it describes the practice, drive, suffering and pain deemed necessary, by the teacher, to achieve excellence. Whilst in many ways gripping, should we also view its basic premise as deeply disturbing,  asks Peter Hudson.

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Hunger Games: Mockingjay 1

Joel Shepherd

Joel Shepherd

What is it about Hunger Games that holds such an appeal for younger movie-goers and especially girls? It’s not just the action and the glamour. In reviewing the latest iteration of the franchise, Sci-Fi author Joel Shepherd looks at what teenagers find so compelling about the Hunger Games, a series which takes its predominantly young audience seriously and asks them to think.

 

 

 

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